No Need for New Year: How to Improve Yourself Now Instead of January 1st

No Need for New Year: How to Improve Yourself Now Instead of January 1st

New YearThere are multiple reasons not to wait until January 1st to try and improve your life. Not only are New Year’s resolutions often an excuse to finally pay attention to things you’ve neglected, but they also notoriously fail. That’s why making the right proactive decisions now can lead you to true change going into and well beyond the new year. Here are a few tips about how to bring positivity and change into your life starting today.

No Need for New Year: How to Improve Yourself Now Instead of January 1st

Start in Your Own Home

Family life is one of the biggest factors in anyone’s quality of life. The holidays can be a stressful time for families, especially ones where you’re dealing with members of different backgrounds. This might include in-laws, stepchildren, estranged partners, and even new arrivals. Learning how to make everyone comfortable is important and can improve not only your family dynamic, but also help you develop coping skills. It’s easy to remember simple things like not forcing quality time among your family members, whether it’s during the holidays or an ordinary week. Planning ahead can also help make it easier to continue this principle into the new year without needing a resolution to do so. Checking in with Dallas-area counselors about how you can “>refine your family’s emotional coping mechanisms can be a great way to start the new year before the new year itself even starts. You can be proactive by making the appointment now.

No Need for New Year: How to Improve Yourself Now Instead of January 1st

Edit Out the Naysayers Right Now

Rethink the way you hear people and their words when you choose something new you want to pursue, whether they’re judgmental or hurtful. Forbes advises that one of the most transformative changes you can make to effect positive change in your life is to stop taking negative statement and remarks from others at face value, and recalibrate how you hear and interpret. For example, you may decide you want to adopt a more positive worldview, but you get the typical naysayer response of making new life revelations at a less stressful time. This is the moment when you need to prevent someone else’s pessimism form entering your mental space and work past it. Fully embracing the validity of your own optimism and keeping judgmental commentary away means you don’t even need a New Year’s resolution, since you’ve already achieved a goal.

No Need for New Year: How to Improve Yourself Now Instead of January 1st

Start Small, End Big

New Year

Huffington Post discusses how to plan achievable New Year’s resolutions once the day comes, but there’s no reason to save these tips until the clock strikes midnight on December 31st. One of the most useful points they make is to start small and choose something manageable. A large reason that resolutions fail is when they’re too grandiose and overwhelming to achieve in the time allotted. Therefore, break your idea down into steps. For example, weight loss is one of the most common resolutions, but doesn’t happen overnight, and certainly not between the old year to the next. If you want to lose weight, start now. Schedule your plan in advance and put the New Year as a goal to already be partway there. Rather than using the New Year as a starting point, use it as a midway point for a goal you’re already putting into action.
There’s always time to fit in an appointment for some guidance with Allen family counseling, especially for yourself. The holidays can be a stressful time, both leading up to and on the actual occasion. Taking some quiet time out to reconfigure your worldview and set some positive, achievable goals before the new year sets in can be transformative going forward.

About the Author:

Jennifer Slingerland Ryan knows a thing or two about kids and families. First, she knows they are joyous, exhilarating, loving and so darn fun. Second, she knows they suck your life dry and make you weep like a baby. By day she’s a psychotherapist; by night she’s a mom and wife. She claims to love therapizing couples, educating parents, reading dystopian fiction and sleeping in her free time (read: she never sleeps). Jennifer has spent over 12 years in private practice working with individuals, couples, and parents who are faced with kid-drama, mamma-drama, and family-drama, and she claims that although some stories make a grown woman cry, she loves it.

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