It Pays the Bills: How to Recover and Restore Your Job Satisfaction

Job Satisfaction

Everyone dislikes their job at one point or another. This is an unavoidable reality of being in the workforce, but there’s a difference between being totally disillusioned and perpetually drained, versus having a bad day or feeling occasionally burnt out. Whether you’re an entrepreneur or work for a large corporation, Job Satisfaction, finding fulfillment and enjoyment in the work you do everyday is important. This process can be aided with the help of Dallas-area counselors. You may not be able to adjust your place of employment, but you can always adjust your perspective. Here are a few tips on how to regain your enthusiasm for your professional life while still paying the bills.

1. Find a Single Thing to Be Happy About

Your workday might be full of stress, but it can help to find one thing that makes you happy. Whether it’s an accomplishment on a project, solving a problem, or praise from your superiors, focusing on one point of positivity in a sea of

Job Satisfaction

frustration can help turn the tide of your mood. It’s easy to forget the good things when you’re focused on why you’re miserable. Harvard Business Review suggests, for example, if you have a job that can be emotionally draining such as a nurse or social worker, at the end of the day, remind yourself of all the good you’re doing. They also recommend making meaningful connections with colleagues who will be familiar with similar feelings. Rediscovering high points can help you shift your attention from the negative to help rediscover passion for your work you may have lost along the way.

2. Compare and Contrast

Job SatisfactionAs the saying goes, the grass is always greener on the other side, but looking at this idea in reverse can help you appreciate what you already have. Comparing your current situation to one you may have had in the past can help reinvent the way you see your current working life. If you had a terrible job, think back on those feelings and recall how you wanted to find a new solution. Contrasting worse jobs to the one you have now can bring to the fore positive qualities of your current job. It’s a reminder that things were once worse, and to focus on the things that you’re currently happy with that are improvements upon the past.

Job Satisfaction

3. Try to Change Your Situation

If your unhappiness stems from something that can ostensibly be changed, such as your title, being proactive and working toward what you want can inspire optimism. One tip that Bustle gives about maintaining a positive attitude is that setting goals and milestones is essential. For example, if you’re currently unhappy at the level you’re at on the food chain, start a conversation with your boss about how you can continue your professional development. Unfortunately, instead of starting these conversations or working toward a goal, many people let opportunities fall to the wayside. Being proactive can go a long way when it comes to things that you can actually change. You need to be responsible for your own happiness.

Job Satisfaction

4. Don’t Bottle Up Your Feelings

Job SatisfactionIf you’re frustrated, don’t pretend that everything is fine. While you need to maintain a professional demeanor at work, going through Allen family counseling can make a big difference to working through negativity. Being able to handle and honor your feelings is essential to restoring faith and vigor in your professional life. One of the biggest mistakes people make when it comes to frustrations or disengagement at work is to hold back their emotions, which is a self-fulfilling prophecy of misery. This also leads to blowing issues out of proportion, which The Positivity Blog warns is a surefire way to kill optimism. Being able to address and process your feelings is what leads to spiritual and emotional growth, allowing you to find new meaning in your work.
Going to work everyday is a fact of life for the average American. Regardless of whether you make a large or small amount of money, if you’ve lost your inspiration on the job, an adjustment to attitude and perspective can make a huge difference in your daily quality of life and transform your worldview.

About the Author:

Jennifer Slingerland Ryan knows a thing or two about kids and families. First, she knows they are joyous, exhilarating, loving and so darn fun. Second, she knows they suck your life dry and make you weep like a baby. By day she’s a psychotherapist; by night she’s a mom and wife. She claims to love therapizing couples, educating parents, reading dystopian fiction and sleeping in her free time (read: she never sleeps). Jennifer has spent over 12 years in private practice working with individuals, couples, and parents who are faced with kid-drama, mamma-drama, and family-drama, and she claims that although some stories make a grown woman cry, she loves it.
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