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Relationship Counseling, Marriage Counseling, Couple Counseling, Attachment Therapy Allen Counseling Center

Information and Articles for Communication Issues, Marriage Communication, Couples Issues, Friendship Issues, Attachment Issues

  • awesome mom

7 Ways to Know You’re an Awesome Mom

Being a Mom is tough work, we  Moms know that. There are times we don't live up to the expectations we have for ourselves, and as a therapist, I find myself needing to let Moms know just how awesome they are. So, I put together a list of ways to know that you are an awesome mom! The most important thing about being an awesome mom is knowing who you are and what you are becoming. You are so much more than Just-a-Mom. Your life is way more than the identifying work, "Mom." You juggle so many things in your life, from being an Kid-Uber driver to rockin' it at the office. Pantsuit by day, messy bun by night, and what you have in between is

  • suicide

Listening to Your Gut: How To Handle “Off” Situations

We have likely all experienced a time when we’ve noticed something “off” about someone we care for. It can often be unclear as to what our role is when we make this observation, but when our gut gets moving, I think it's important to take action! It could be something simply, like your friend is having a bad day. Or, it could be that this person is genuingly in trouble and thinking of something like suicide. Do you say something? Do you leave them alone to handle what they need to? Depending on your relationship with the person, you may say something immediately or wait until later. The fact of the matter is, we don’t know until we ask how we may be of help

  • lyndsey perry

5 Text-Based Ways to Show Your Partner Love

Gary Chapman describes the idea of love languages which basically says that there are five different ways couples express and experience love, says EveWoman. The first one is through words of affirmation then through quality time followed by giving gifts, acts of service and physical touch. Knowing these things can help you build a stronger emotional bond between you and your partner. Know each other’s language Given that idea, it’s essential that you find out what your partner’s love language is. What does she do to express her love for your? For instance, does your spouse or partner love to cuddle up to you? Does she often ask for hugs or does she like it when you’re both on the couch, in each other arms

  • physical touch

Physical Touch vs Sex: Love Language Matters

Our culture, more or less, predisposes us to think of ourselves as sexual creatures. From the movies we imbibe to the books we devour, our unending fascination with and interest in all things sexual has been well documented throughout ages of human civilizations. A book was even written on the topic of love languages, which includes physical touch. Knowing your spouse's love language as well as your own, can be incredibly helpful. Sex vs Physical touch: which matters more? In romantic relationships, sex is an essential part of the dynamic. More than the sex, though, touch can be a much more important element in the relationship. Here’s why: It’s a form of communication One of the many things more important than sex in a relationship is

Being a Single Parent and Falling In Love Again

There are 13.7 million single parents in the US who are raising about 22 million children, based on a report released by the Census Bureau. That amounts to about 26 percent of children under 21 in America today, The Spruce says. Given the complications of trying to start a relationship when a child is involved, it’s not altogether surprising that the average single parent is wary of falling in love again. The hurdle of time One of the reasons why single parents find it hard to find romantic partners is the lack of time. In the UK, about 70 percent of single parents do not get any opportunities to meet anyone new in their lives. About 80 percent, on the other hand, do not have

  • 5 Words We Need to Stop Using in Relationships

5 Words We Need to Stop Using in Relationships

There are words we all use that seem innocuous. However, some of them are nefarious whether we realize it or not. Love is strong but very fragile at the same time, so handling feelings with care is always necessary. Here are five words you should ditch immediately to improve how you communicate with your partner. 1. Stop “Nagging” Me This word is a serious trigger for a lot of people, but especially women. Ravishly points out that women and men communicate differently, with women being more likely to be verbal. Therapy can help a lot when it comes to bridging a gap in communication, especially with the help of an Allen-based therapist. This word infers that emotions are empty complaints and invalidates feelings, and is

The ABCs of Friendship, and Why They’re REALLY Important

From friends, family, spouse, co-workers, church members, and others, I want to know who around this client knows what's going on with them, and will support them no matter what. Usually, I'm met with a "deer-in-headlights" look. Rarely do clients want to take their "therapy issue" to their support system. Spouses may know an angry side of the problem, but that's not REALLY knowing.