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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy | Allen Counseling Center | I Choose Change
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Cognitive Behavioral Therapy at Allen Counseling Center

Changing thought patterns to overcome depression, anxiety, grief and loss, parent issues, substance abuse, addiction, sex therapy, social anxiety, eating disorders, body image, trauma, and wellness coaching

  • spring stress

4 Ways to Deal with Spring Stress

In theory, spring is supposed to be the time of year when it’s easy to relax. We don't expect Spring stress, but of course, we are human. The sun starts shining again, the days get longer, flowers bloom and heavy winter coats get put away. However, according to some studies, The Washington Post reports that there are increased instances of depression in the springtime. These are attributed to the lengthening of daylight which can mess up your chemical regulatory system. This can also be a symptom of SAD which can be diagnosed and treated by a doctor. A good place to start is by seeing an Allen Counselor to assess your symptoms and feelings. There’s also Easter, a major holiday for some families, and there’s no

  • optimism

Optimism: The Spring Thaw Your Mind Needs

Anyone who’s ever said that optimism is simply a state of mind probably never tried to be truly optimistic. The truth is, it’s not easy, especially if you’re going through a difficult time in your life or dealing with other troubles. Optimism is something you have to work for and work at, but in the end it can be very rewarding. Here are a few suggestions for how to find your inner optimism this spring. Optimism Is Not About Denial There’s a big difference between blind optimism, which amounts to denial, versus reconfiguring your perspective. NBC discusses that the brand of optimism that can positively impact your brain and increase life span is all about acknowledging stressors and dealing with them productively. Being in denial

  • help for anxiety at i choose change allen counseling center

Anxiety

Anxiety can be one of the most difficult and frightening mental health issues to deal with, especially since much of the disorder is self-manufactured fear. The stats say it all: over 40 million Americans are affected by severe anxiety, and 40 percent of adults will experience some kind of anxiety disorder in their life. However, only a third of adults and one-fifth of teens receive treatment. If you feel like you might be experiencing an anxiety disorder, here are a few starting points. What Having an Anxiety Disorder Feels Like Mental health terms get thrown around a lot, but what’s important to remember is that there’s a big difference between feeling anxious versus experiencing a decrease in functionality and the ability to calm yourself down.

  • friendship

You Are The Company You Keep

Why do we keep doing and feeling the same things over and over again, even when they aren't serving us well in any capacity whatsoever? Oh, the madness! Consciousness is a “here-and-now” experience of focused attention that is fundamentally a measure of how our body, thoughts, and mind is changed by interaction with our internal or external world. As such, our caretakers as infants played a vital role in helping us make sense of our internal and external worlds. We came to know who we are because of what they mirrored back to us, and therefore, consciousness is said to be context-dependent. This is a process in which we regulate our inner and outer worlds, to gain an understanding, if you will, of how the world operates

Be The Audience: Looking at Your Life From the Outside

“It’s difficult to be curious and unhappy at the same time.” – Mark WilliamsMuch of the change process is about awareness of yourself and others. Consciousness will allow you to take ownership of what is yours so you can change it. I liken personal awareness to a theatrical production. Often, I will ask my clients to imagine themselves in a play. The show will be the play of their own life, where they are the writer, director, producer, set director, stage hands, and actor. They play every single role of the play! And, in life, we do. We write our own lives, set the scene, direct the show, and act out based on the lines we’ve given ourselves. However, there is one part of the

Narrative Self: Insert Your Life Story Here

Your life script is so automatic, that to change, you need to stop and just be the audience in the play of your own life. Observe the writing, directing, production and set design of your own life's play - the one you're creating. As you begin to learn about who you are, understanding your powerlessness and power all at once, you will begin to realize that what you’ve learned about “who I am” is really an exercise in thousands of experiences which have occurred around you and which shape your mind into a story that you adopt as “mine.” The stories you hang on to about your life, and about the world around you, is what helps you make sense of ourselves and other people.

The Legacy of Trauma

Guest Blog by Jenny Wang, M.A., LPC It was the middle of a difficult freshman year of college, and I found myself waiting in my lawyer’s office for the deposition to begin. I had been dreading this for weeks, so I called my most trusted confidant to pass the time. Finally, I was called in to meet with the opposing party’s attorney and the questioning began. I’m sure there were many questions that were focused on the specific recollections regarding the collision I was a survivor of. However, the questions that still burn clearly in my mind more than twenty years later were the ones centered around my (then) current emotional state: Do you sleep significantly less or more than you did before the accident?